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Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Tlayacapan: the barrio chapels 3

In this third and final post on the chapels of Tlayacapan we picture several ermitas on the outskirts of the town that mark traditional exit points from the village, such as San NicolásSan Lorenzo, La Natividad and El Tránsito, as well as some other minor capillas. 
 
San Nicolás is a typical boundary ermita, now restored and in use, notable for its span of brick vaulting. The chapel also sustained damage in the September 19 quake, with the partial loss of it belfry. No word yet on effects on the interior.
San Nicolás after the quake
El Tránsito. Except for a toppled merlon beside its surmounting espadaña, this recently restored and re-painted chapel front seems to have suffered little 'quake damage.
San Lorenzo
Likewise, the chapel of San Lorenzo escaped with the cracking of its belfry and the loss of a single merlon.
 
La Natividad
Like several others, the attractive chapel of La Natividad suffered a fallen tower and sections of its gable.
La Natividad after the 'quake
A number of smaller chapels also mark ancient topographic or sacred sites as well as places of private and public devotion in outlying barrios of Tlayacapan. 
   These include those of San Miguel, San Jerónimo, La Magdalena and the Guadalupe Chapel, all of which appear to have suffered minimal damage according to these post quake pictures, except for the rustic ermita of La Magdalena whose belfry broke.
San Miguel
San Jerónimo
La Magdalena
Plus three smaller chapels on the west side of Tlayacapan:
La Asunción
La Concepción, with damaged belfry
San Diego
We will update this post if and when more data and pictures are forthcoming. Many thanks to Robert Jackson who has undertaken to visit, photograph and report on earthquake damage in Tlayacapan and the stricken state of Morelos.

Text © Richard D. Perry.  new color images © 2017 courtesy of Robert Jackson

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